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Jamie Peck

Title/Position: Canada Research Chair in Urban & Regional Political Economy
Department/Faculty/Institution: Geography, University of British Columbia
Degree(s)/School(s): BA, PhD University of Manchester
E-mail: jamie.peck@ubc.ca
Website: http://www.geog.ubc.ca/~peck/

MCRI Projects: A2: Governance; C2: North America Research Cluster.

Background: Jamie Peck is an economic geographer, with research interests in urban theory, policy, and politics; labor geography and labor-market restructuring; neoliberalization; theories of socioeconomic regulation and governance; and economic restructuring.  His publication record includes nine books and more than 200 research articles, translated into more than a dozen languages.  Peck’s work has been supported by the Ford Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Commonwealth Fund of New York, NSF, SSHRC, ESRC, and the European Commission. Peck is Canada Research Chair in Urban & Regional Political Economy and Professor of Geography at the University of British Columbia. Previously, he was Professor of Geography & Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA and Professor of Geography at the University of Manchester, UK. The recipient of Guggehneim and Harkness fellowships, Peck has held visiting positions at Melbourne, Johns Hopkins, Witwatersrand, Oslo, Nottingham, Queen’s University Belfast, Amsterdam, and the National University of Singapore.

Research Interests: urban theory and politics; labor markets, employment and welfare policy, socioeconomic governance; neoliberalism.

Selected Publications:

Peck, Jamie. (2011). Neoliberal Suburbanism: Frontier Space. Urban Geography, 32(6), pp. 884-919.  DOI: 10.2747/0272-3638.32.6.884. [A2: Governance]

Theodore N, Peck J and Brenner N (2011) Neoliberal urbanism: cities and the rule of markets. In G Bridge & S Watson (eds) The new Blackwell companion to the city. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 15-25

Peck J (2011) Creative moments: working culture … through municipal socialism and neoliberal urbanism. In E McCann & K Ward (eds) Mobile urbanism: cities and policymaking in the global age. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press

Peck J (2010) Constructions of neoliberal reason. Oxford: Oxford University Press

Peck J (2009) The cult of urban creativity. In R Keil & R Mahon (eds) Leviathan undone? Towards a political economy of scale. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 159-176

Doussard M, Peck J and Theodore N (2009) After deindustrialization: uneven growth and economic inequality in “postindustrial” Chicago. Economic Geography 85(2): 183-207

Peck J, Theodore N and Brenner N (2009) Neoliberal urbanism: models, moments, and mutations. SAIS Review of International Affairs 29(1): 49-66

Leitner H, Peck J and Sheppard E (eds) (2007) Contesting neoliberalism: urban frontiers. New York: Guilford

Peck J (2005) Struggling with the creative class. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research 24(4): 740-770

Peck J and Tickell A (2002) Neoliberalizing space. Antipode 34(3): 380-404

Peck J and Ward K (eds) (2002) City of revolution: restructuring Manchester. Manchester: Manchester University Press

Peck J and Theodore N (2001) Contingent Chicago: restructuring the spaces of temporary labor. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research 25(3): 471-496

Jessop B, Peck J and Tickell A (1999) Retooling the machine: economic crisis, state restructuring, and urban politics.  In AEG Jonas & D Wilson (eds) The urban growth machine: critical perspectives two decades later. New York: SUNY Press, 141-159

Cochrane A, Peck J and Tickell A (1996) Manchester plays games: exploring the local politics of globalization. Urban Studies 33(8): 1319-1336

Peck J (1995) Moving and shaking: business elites, state localism and urban privatism. Progress in Human Geography 19(1): 16-46

Peck J and Tickell A (1995) Business goes local: dissecting the “business agenda” in Manchester. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research 19(1): 55-78